Accounting Assessment for Fall 2016-Spring 2017

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Florida Memorial University Assessment for Fall 2016-Spring 2017

Degree Program: BS Accounting

Completed by: Dr. Renee Forbes Williams, CPA, Associate Professor of Accounting

I. Mission Statement of Accounting Program

The mission of the Accounting program is to prepare students for professional careers in public accounting, private industry accounting, and governmental accounting. The program also prepares students for graduate schools and programs.

II. Use of Results from Last Assessment Cycle
Changes to Assessment Plan: N/A

Changes to Academic Processes: N/A

Changes to Curriculum:

(1) Groups are developed to review principle and foundation accounting concepts.
(2) Accounting faculty works with each group to review group assignments.
(3) Increase in accounting online assignments.

a. Use of Results/Action Plan of the past academic years for SLO 1

2009-2010 Additional emphasis on a review of basic financial and managerial accounting concepts in Acc 211 and Acc 212 Principles of Accounting I and II, Acc 311 and Acc 312 Intermediate of Accounting I and II.
Continue to offer tutoring sessions.
2010-2011 Additional emphasis on the analysis of the financial accounting and reporting issues faced by multinational companies and the financial reporting general accepted accounting principles (GAAP) and practices Acc 211, Acc 311 and Acc 312
Continue to offer tutoring sessions.
2011-2012 Additional emphasis on applying theories through real world examples in Acc 211 and Acc 212 and Acc 311 and Acc 312
Continue to offer tutoring sessions.
2012-2013 Continue to have tutoring sessions.
2013-2014 Student study guides will be provided
Continued to have tutoring sessions
2014-2015 More Emphasis on group assignments
Student study guides will be provided
Continued to have tutoring sessions
2015-2016 Emphasis placed on reviewing principles and foundation of accounting;
More Emphasis on group assignments
Student study guides will be provided
Continued to have tutoring sessions

b. Use of Results/Action Plan of the past academic years for SLO 2

2009-2010 More emphasis on financial accounting Acc 311 and Acc 312
More indebt discussions with students on GAAP 311 and 312
2010-2011 More indebt discussions with students on GAAP 311 and 312
2011-2012 Emphasis on group project
2012-2013 Emphasis on hand on practical experience Acc 434 Federal Tax II
2013-2014 More emphasis on financial accounting Acc 311 and Acc 312
More indebt discussions with students on GAAP 311 and 312
2014-2015 More Emphasis on group assignments
Student study guides will be provided
Continued to have tutoring sessions
2015-2016 Emphasis placed on reviewing principles and foundation of accounting;
More Emphasis on group assignments
Student study guides will be provided
Continued to have tutoring sessions

c. Use of Results/Action Plan of the past academic years for SLO 3

2009-2010 Students’ performance in accounting courses are closely monitored.
2010-2011 Students’ performance in accounting courses are closely monitored.
2011-2012 Emphasis on classroom exercises
Continue to advise to motivate students who lack motivation to study.
2012-2013 Emphasis on classroom exercises
Students’ performance in accounting courses are closely monitored.
Continue to advise to motivate students who lack motivation to study.
2013-2014 Emphasis on classroom exercises
Students’ performance in accounting courses are closely monitored.
Continue to advise to motivate students who lack motivation to study.
2014-2015 Emphasis placed on reviewing principles and foundation of accounting;
Students’ performance in accounting courses are closely monitored.
Continue to advise to motivate students who lack motivation to study
2015-2016 Emphasis placed on reviewing principles and foundation of accounting;
Students’ performance in accounting courses are closely monitored.
Continue to advise to motivate students who lack motivation to study.

III. Assessment Report

Program Goals:
The goals of the program are as follows:

Goal 1. To help students achieve a level of accounting knowledge and critical thinking skills appropriate for accounting professionals
Goal 2. To help students achieve a minimum level of effective communication skills appropriate for accounting professionals
Goal 3. To assist students in acquiring the ability to use technology in making professional business decisions and presentations
Goal 4. To provide qualified accounting graduates to the public, private, and governmental sectors
Goal 5. To provide a fundamental background in the area of accounting theories for students who wish to pursue advanced study
Goal 6. To promote research and dissemination of knowledge of developments in the accounting profession
Goal 7. To encourage student interaction with the accounting profession
Goal 8. To teach analysis of the financial accounting and reporting issues faced by multinational companies and the financial reporting principles and practices in countries other than the US.

Program Student Learning Outcomes Assessment

SLO1: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the basic accounting concepts essential to recording business transactions and preparing & analyzing financial statements.

SLO2: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the theory and practice of accounting for businesses, including business combination, multinational enterprises, governmental and not-for-profit entities.

SLO3: Accounting students should be exposed to professional work experience and on the job training in accounting and/or the business sector (student internships).

SLO1: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the basic accounting concepts essential to recording business transactions and preparing & analyzing financial statements. Acc 211, Acc 212, Acc 311

At least 75% of the accounting students demonstrated an understanding of the basic accounting concepts essential to recording business transactions and preparing & analyzing financial statements by completion of a myaccoutninglab.com project with minimal to no error .The following table outlines the components of the learning outcome and the average percent of students who have met the various evaluation criteria of the learning outcome.

Evaluation Criteria Fails to Meet Expectations (1) Meets Expectations (2) Exceeds Expectations (3) Results
Balance Sheet Incorrect or inappropriate data Correct data used with minimal errors Correct data used without any errors 05% – 3 85% – 2 10% – 1
Income Statement Incorrect or inappropriate data Correct data used with minimal errors Correct data used without any errors 05% – 3 85% – 2 10% – 1
Retained Earnings Incorrect or inappropriate data Correct data used with minimal errors Correct data used without any errors 05% – 3 85% – 2 10% – 1
Business Transactions Incorrect or inappropriate data Correct data used with minimal errors Correct data used without any errors 05% – 3 85% – 2 10% – 1

SLO1: Use of Results/Action Plan of the past academic years
2011_2012: Additional emphasis on the review of basic accounting concepts in Acc 211, 212, 311, 312, 411
2013¬_2014: Use more real world examples in all accounting course. Increase online assignments.
2015_2016: Use more real world examples in all accounting course. Increase online assignments. Add group assignments in all accounting courses.

SLO2: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the theory and practice of accounting for businesses.
Acc 211, Acc 212, Acc 311, Acc312, Acc 411

At least 75% of the accounting students will demonstrate an understanding of the theory and practice of accounting for businesses with minimal to no error.

Evaluation Criteria Fails to Meet Expectations (1) Meets Expectations (2) Exceeds Expectations (3) Results
Bank Reconciliations Incorrect or inappropriate data Correct data used with minimal errors Correct data used without any errors 05% – 3 75% – 2 20% – 1
Adjusting Entries Incorrect or inappropriate data Correct data used with minimal errors Correct data used without any errors 05% – 3 75% – 2 20% – 1
Journal Entries
Incorrect or inappropriate data Correct data used with minimal errors Correct data used without any errors 05% – 3 75% – 2 20% – 1
Depreciation
Incorrect or inappropriate data Correct data used with minimal errors Correct data used without any errors 05% – 3 75% – 2 20% – 1

FIFO & LIFO Incorrect or inappropriate data Correct data used with minimal errors Correct data used without any errors 05% – 3 75% – 2 20% – 1

SLO1: Use of Results/Action Plan of the past academic years
2011_2012: Additional emphasis on the review of basic accounting concepts in Acc 211, 212, 311, 312, 411
2013¬_2014: Use more real world examples in all accounting course. Increase online assignments.
2015_2016: Use more real world examples in all accounting course. Increase online assignments. Add group assignments in all accounting courses.

SLO3: Accounting students should be exposed to professional work experience and on the job training in accounting and/or the business sector (student internships).

Means of Program Assessment: Accounting students will go through internship experience. Students in the majors are required to take a Business Internship & Seminar course. All students are required to intern with a company and be evaluated by their supervisors using an Intern Performance Review Form.
Criteria for Success 1: Eighty percent (80%) of the Accounting on a 5 point Likert scale will demonstrate communication skills, career planning, and on the-the-job training in the business sector through an internship experience. The evaluation is by interns superiors and show their overall satisfaction’s of the interns.
Criteria for Success 2: Eighty-five percent (85%) of the accounting students on a 5 point Likert scale demonstrated interpersonal skills, and professional work experience in the business sector through an internship experience.
Course in which SLO 3 is assessed: Bus 450 Business Internship & Seminar.
Results: The data revealed that the Accounting majors performed above the threshold of 85% (above 90%,) in communication skills, career planning, and on the-the-job training and students performed close to the threshold of 85% (87% for Accounting) in interpersonal skills, and professional work experience in the accounting.

SLO3: Use of Results/Action Plan of the past academic years
2011_2012: Additional emphasis will be placed on external relationships.
2013_2014: Additional emphasis will be placed on external relationships including IRS and NABA.
2015_2016: Encourage student participation in job/intern fairs. Prepare students for interviews.
2017_2018: Use of results to improve program: The faculty who teaches the BUS 450 Business Internship & Seminars needs to develop strategies to maintain and improve students’ internship performance. The strategies may include:

• Communications and feedback from the supervisors of the student interns
• Inclusion of work related topics in the course content
• Guest speakers with Human Resource Management and Professional Development expertise.
• To encourage more students to participate in the School of Business sponsored professional development activities, especially the ones that are organized by the School of Business Advisory Council with specific business theme.

2. Rationale: The employability of students after graduation is of the academic outcomes of the School of Business.

3. Changes in assessment: None.

4. Additional resources/budget required: None.

Students Satisfaction Assessment Accounting

First Means of Assessment and Criteria for Success

Means of Assessment: School of Business developed a survey to measure Accounting majors alumni satisfaction with professional and career development. Students were asked to choose one of the flowing:
Strongly Disagree Neutral in Agreement Agree Strongly Agree

Criteria for Success: The Alumni Survey satisfaction results will be greater than 80%.

Course in which SLO is assessed: Survey.

Results: The results shows that Accounting majors experience has prepared students relatively to receive a promotion, and change career (60% and 50%, respectability).

Accounting Majors Alumni Satisfaction Survey

Use of Results/Action Plan:

1. Use of results to improve program: The School needs to develop strategies to improve the Accounting alumni professional and career development.
2. Rationale: The alumni satisfaction helps the School of Business in its recruitment and fund raising.
3. Changes in assessment: None.
4. Additional resources/budget required: No.

Second Means of Assessment and Criteria for Success Accounting Majors

Means of Assessment: School of Business developed a survey to measure Accounting majors alumni satisfaction with faculty advisement and guidance. Students were asked to choose one of the flowing:
Strongly Disagree Neutral in Agreement Agree Strongly Agree

Criteria for Success: The Alumni Survey satisfaction results will be greater than 80%.

Course in which SLO is assessed: Survey.

Results: The Accounting major alumni showed strong satisfaction (80%) with their faculty advisement and high satisfaction (100% strongly agree) with the faculty guidance.

Accounting Majors Alumni Satisfaction survey

Use of Results/Action Plan:
1. Use of results to improve program: The faculty need to improve their advisement to Accounting students to get strong satisfaction by students.
2. Rationale: The alumni satisfaction helps the School of Business in its recruitment and fund raising.
3. Changes in assessment: None.
4. Additional resources/budget required: No.

Third Means of Assessment and Criteria for Success Accounting Majors

Means of Assessment: School of Business developed a survey to measure Accounting majors alumni satisfaction with curriculum and faculty qualifications. Students were asked to choose one of the flowing:
Strongly Disagree Neutral in Agreement Agree Strongly Agree

Criteria for Success: The Alumni Survey satisfaction results will be greater than 80%.

Course in which SLO is assessed: Survey.

Results: The Accounting major alumni showed satisfaction (60% strongly agree and 40% agree) with the demanding curriculum, strong satisfaction with faculty qualifications (100% strongly agree), and satisfaction
with their preparedness to pursue higher academic degrees after receiving Accounting degree
(80% strongly Agree, 20% agree).
Accounting Majors Alumni Satisfaction survey

Use of Results/Action Plan:

1. Use of results to improve program: The survey results have to be used for recruiting of students to the Accounting Program.
2. Rationale: The alumni satisfaction helps the School of Business in its recruitment and fund raising.
3. Changes in assessment: None.
4. Additional resources/budget required: No.

Forth Means of Assessment and Criteria for Success Accounting Majors

Means of Assessment: School of Business developed a survey to measure overall Accounting majors alumni satisfaction with the career and academic development as compare to other Accounting programs. Students
were asked to choose one of the flowing:
Strongly Disagree Neutral in Agreement Agree Strongly Agree

Criteria for Success: The Alumni Survey satisfaction results will be greater than 80%.

Course in which SLO is assessed: Survey.

Results: The Accounting majors alumni survey showed strong students satisfaction (60% strongly agree)
with the professional development and strong satisfaction (80% strongly agree) with choosing Florida
Memorial Accounting program.
Accounting Majors Alumni Satisfaction Survey

Use of Results/Action Plan:

1. Use of results to improve program: The survey results have to be used for recruiting of students to the Accounting Program.
2. Rationale: The alumni satisfaction helps the School of Business in its recruitment and fund raising.
3. Changes in assessment: None.
4. Additional resources/budget required: No.

Students Satisfaction Assessment-Undergraduate Salary Accounting
Means of Assessment: School of Business developed a survey to measure alumni salary range and average.
Criteria for Success: The Alumni salary survey results will be compatible with national average salary norm.
Source: data for 2015 are found at http://www.payscale.com/best-colleges/degrees.asp. Median Accounting major salary for 2015: $43,000.
Course in which SLO is assessed: Survey.
Results: The average salary for Accounting major alumni survey showed that Accounting graduates salary are compatible or greater to the national norm.

Use of Results/Action Plan:
1. Use of results to improve program: The survey results have to be used for recruiting of students to the Accounting program.
2. Rationale: The alumni satisfaction helps the School of Business in its recruitment and fund raising.
3. Changes in assessment: None.
4. Additional resources/budget required: No.

Business Administration Assessment Fall 2016-Spring 2017

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Florida Memorial Assessment For Fall 2016 Spring 2017
Degree Program Title
BS Business Administration

Completed by:
Dr. Abbass Entessari

I. Degree Program Mission Statement
The Business Administration program is designed to direct students toward an integrated approach to modern management, theory and practice, the changing nature of management, management in a changing global environment, and creative problem solving.

II. Use of Results from Last Assessment Cycle
Use of Results from 2015-2016 Assessment

Based on the assessment results from fall 2012, the Business Administration faculty has continued or adopted the following changes to improve the Business Administration program (Business Administration program includes courses in Accounting, Management, Finance, and Marketing):

Curriculum:

* To employ at least three faculty in Accounting, Economics, and Management. This has not been accomplished as of now.
* To assist students in their academic progress, the School of Business has established a Learning Center. The Center has employed from three (3) to five (5) tutors every semester. The Center has two (2) Bloomberg terminals and four (4) computers with GMAT preparation software for students interested in taking GMAT for the Master of Business Administration (MBA) matriculation.
* To continue encourage and ask students to use web learning and tutorial resources such as Kahn Academy, You tube business subject videos as part of their assignments in the classes.
* To continue make sure students have the required textbook for the class. Some textbooks are downloadable to the cell phones.
* To continue teach students develop study plan and to instill better studying habits.
* To continue properly advise students in regard to their course load
* To continue emphasize in international business topics such as global Money System and Competition in a Global Market.
* To continue have students use online resources provided by the publishers to supplement class instructions.
* The faculty need to get feedback from students in the class to find out the reasons for their less than satisfactory rating of the academic performance.
* To continue emphasize corporate social responsibility, managing diversity, managing in the global arena, managing entrepreneurship, strategic planning, planning tools, organizing fundamentals, responsibility and authority, human resources, organization change, influencing and communication, motivation, group and teams, managing organization resources, creativity, and controlling across business curriculum.
* To strengthen the academic rigor in the curriculum and respond to market demands. For instance, a Supply Chain Management course has been added to the School of Business course offering. The course is offered alternatively with Operation Research course. The Entrepreneurship course has become a required course from Fall 2015 (it was an elective course before).
* To provide flexible course selection for the School of Business students, the School now offers Principles of Management and Principles of Marketing online. Several courses are also offed in hybrid formats.
* To continue the additional coverage of financial ratio analysis and financial statements in the core accounting courses. A particular emphasis should be placed on applying these concepts through real world examples.
* To provide exercises that require students to calculate and interpret financial ratios, financial statements, diagnose problems, and make recommendations for a real world company would.
* to utilize exam questions that emphasize application as opposed to just calculation of financial ratios or interpretation of financial statements. Additional emphasis is needed on the closing process, the adjusting process, inventory, bank reconciliation, notes receivable, bonds payable, and fixed assets depreciation in the accounting core
* Additional emphasis is needed on marketing management, branding strategies and the promotional mix in the marketing core.
* To add topics on the role of national economy, macro-economic policies, the market system, economic tools, profit and costs of the firm, consumer choice and economic regulations in the economics core.
* To add marketing management component to Strategic Management in order to better prepare students for Senior Project presentation.
* To add additional coverage of the product life cycle in core marketing courses and strategic management.
* To add executive summary component to term papers that don’t already have this component.
* To add oral and written communication components throughout the business administration program. The Senior Project written and oral communication rubric should be utilized for assessment purposes throughout the program. Students should receive their score on this rubric after their communication event so that they can see what areas need improvement.
* To put additional emphasis on industry analysis from an international perspective in the Business Administration program. A likely candidate for this emphasis is the International Business class.
* To include compensation issues and their effect on motivation and productivity in the human resource management course. Organizational behavior should be included as a component on team dynamics and group exercises that encourage students to take a leadership role.

Professional and Career Development:

* To continue encourage more students to participate in the School of Business sponsored professional development activities, especially the ones that are organized by the School of Business Advisory Council with specific business theme.
* To obtain communications and feedbacks from the supervisors of the student interns.
* To Include work related topics in the Business Internship and Seminar course content.
* To continue invitation of guest speakers with real world expertise in the class rooms.
* To encourage students in National Association of Black Accountant (NABA), Finance, Marketing, and Delta Mu Delta Business Honor Society clubs to attend professional and academic workshops and seminars sponsored by local business and professional organizations and School’s stockholders.

Students and Alumni Satisfactions:

* To develop strategies to improve the alumni professional and career development.
* To obtain on-going communication and feedback with alumni.
* To inform alumni (through School’s web-page) of the new initiatives undertaken by the School of Business through dissemination of Newsletter and Highlights of the School accomplishments, and students Learning Outcomes Assessments.
* To modify and include alumni recommendations for improvement of the School of Business programs and professional and career development in the Alumni Satisfaction Surveys.

III. Assessment Report, Academic and Experiential Performance
Goals
Goal 1:

Business Administration students will demonstrate competency in overall business knowledge and knowledge of major functional business areas.

Goal 2:

Business Administration graduates will demonstrate strong quantitative and qualitative knowledge and analytical skill of major functional business areas.

Goal 3:

Business Administration graduates will develop strong business internship and interpersonal skills.

Goal 4:

Business Administration alumni are surveyed to evaluate their satisfaction related to the curriculum, faculty, academic and professional development.

Student Learning Outcomes Assessment (SLOs)

SLO 1. Business Administration Students demonstrate Business knowledge, knowledge of major functional business areas.

SLO2. Students should understand the general business theories, principles, concepts, and the steps needed to create and launch a new business.
SLO3. Students should be exposed to professional work experience and on the job training in the business sector.

SLO 1/(G 1): Business Administration Students demonstrate Business knowledge, knowledge of major functional business areas.

Means of Assessment and Criteria for Success:
First Means of Assessment: The Business Strategy Game (BSG) – Learning Assurance Report (modeled after AACSB Learning Assurance Standards). Worldwide computer simulation based on a real world company. The Learning Assurance Report is useful in two very important respects. One, it provides a clear overview of how well students rank relative to students at other schools who have gone through the competition-based simulation exercise. Two the report provides highly credible evidence regarding the caliber of overall and specific business understanding and decision-making skills of the students participating.

Criteria for Success: Students in Bus 498 Senior project in Business will rank in the 50th percentile or higher nationally, on average, in each business knowledge area of the learning assurance report.

Course in which SLO is assessed: Bus 498 Senior project in Business. Number of students in the class: 35.

Results: Students performed above 50th percentile in Accounting & Financial Statement, Financial Management Principles, Marketing Management, Human Recourses, and Strategic Analysis and Planning subjects in Spring 2017. Students performed below 50th percentile in Operation Management, and Social Responsibility. Students showed noticeable improvement in Accounting & Financial Statement Analysis, Financial Management Principles, and Human Resources.

Note: The number of students in the BUS 498 for Fall 2016 was small and the BGS result were not reported here. The results, however, followed close pattern as Spring 2015 test results.

Population statistics: Students=39,872, Companies=14,397, Schools 414, Countries 37 in Fall 2013. Students=39,897, Companies=14,210, Schools=415, Countries=35 in Spring 2014. Students=46,490, Companies=16,781, Schools 418, Countries 36 in Spring 2017. The percentile rankings are the mean of Fall 2013 and Spring 2014 Learning Assurance Reports. Number of students in the class: 35.

Use of Results/Action Plan:

1. Use of results to improve program: The faculty in the School of Business needs to review the curriculum, course content, and course delivery methods to improve the areas that student perform below 50th percentile.

2. Rationale: The BSG measurement intends to: One, provides a clear overview of how well students rank relative to students at other schools who have gone through the competition-based simulation exercise. Two, the report provides highly credible evidence regarding the caliber of overall and specific business understanding and decision-making skills of the students participating

3. Changes in assessment: None

4. Additional resources/budget required: None.

Seven (2011-2017) Years Comparison

The Business Strategy Game (BSG) – Learning Assurance Report

Seven Years Results Comparison of Business Strategy Game:

1. Students performed above 50 percentile in Operation Management questions (the 2011-12result and Spring 2017 were slightly below 50 percentile).
2. Students performed above 50 percentile in Financial Management questions in 2010-11, 2012-13, and 2013-14, and spring 2017 (the 2011-12 and 2014-15 results were slightly below 50 percentile).
3. Students performed above 50 percentile in Marketing Management from 2012-13 to Spring 2017. Students showed gradual improvement in Marketing Management subjects from 2010-11.
4. Students performed below 50 percentile in Financial Analysis in every year except 2013-14 and Spring 2017. The results, however, has shown improvement from 2010-11.
5. Students performed consistently above 50 percentile in Strategy Analysis. Students have shown steady improvements from 2010-11.

Second Means of Assessment and Criteria for Success:

Means of Assessment: Internal Assessment Exam (IAE) developed by the faculty of the School of Business. This exam encompasses the business areas of management, finance, accounting, marketing and economics.

Criteria for Success: Students in BUS 498 Senior Project in Business are expected to perform with a mean percent correct of 50% or better in each functional area (Management, Finance, Accounting, Marketing, and Economics).
Course in which SLO is assessed: BUS 498 Senior Project in Business.

Results: Student generally responded above the overall 50% criteria in questions related to Finance, and Marketing topics. Students responding to questions in management, accounting, and economics topics responded below the 50% target.

Note: Due to low enrollment in Fall 2016, the data is based on the Spring 2017 Internal Assessment Exam.

Use of Results/Action Plan:
1. Use of results to improve program: Faculty need to review the results and develop strategies to improve the students’ deficiencies in the subject areas.
2. Rationale: The faculty intended to evaluate students’ general knowledge of business topics at the point of graduation using an internally developed exit exam.
3. Changes in assessment: May develop new Internal Exam.
4. Additional resources/budget required: None.

Seven (2011-2017) Years Comparison

Seven Years Results Comparison of Internal Assessment Exam:

1. Students responses in Management questions generally improved compared to 2010. The responses were above 50% from 2011 to 2015. The results were unsatisfactory in Spring 2017.
2. Students responses in Finance questions generally improved compared to 2010. The responses were above 50% from 2011 to 2017.
3. Students performed inconsistent and below 50% in Accounting questions responses.
4. Students responses in Marketing questions generally improved from 2010. The responses were above 50% from 2011 to 2017.
5. Students performance in Economics questions improved from 2010. The results, however, were slightly above 50%. The responses were above 50% from 2011 to 2017.

SLO 2 /(G 2): Students should understand the general business theories, principles, concepts, and the steps needed to create and launch a new business.
Means of Assessment: Faculty panel rating of senior project presentations to measure School of Business students’ qualitative and quantitative knowledge and skills (BUS, FIN and MAR Majors Combined).

Criteria for Success: The mean score of the faculty panel when assessing quantitative and qualitative knowledge and skills of graduating seniors during their Senior Project final presentation will be greater than 3.5 (70%) on a 5 point Likert scale. This faculty assessment is conducted for the following functional areas: general business knowledge, financial knowledge, marketing knowledge, management knowledge, and knowledge of the external forces affecting business.

Course in which SLO is assessed: Bus 498 Senior project in Business

Results: Student responded above the 4.1 (80%) on a 5 point Likert scale.

Use of Results/Action Plan:

1. Use of results to improve program: Faculty need to review the results and develop strategies to improve the students’ deficiencies in the subject areas. Additionally, assessment results from the open ended question and answer period during Senior Project presentation indicated a couple of areas that can be addressed to improve student learning outcomes. Issues that need improvement centered on the students’ general business knowledge and the students’ understanding of management and marketing topics. Several specific issues were uncovered:
• Students did not seem to realize the changing shape of the industry as they tried to analyze a particular industry operating in other parts of the world. For example, when analyzing the automobile industry, students readily understood the factors in the U.S. external environment but did not seem to fully understand the implications in other world markets such as China and Japan and that these external environments could be substantially different.
• Students also did not seem to grasp the complex and fluid nature of the product life cycle and the complexities involved in defining an industry and a product and its lifecycle. For example, students had trouble differentiating between the U.S. automobile and computer industries as a whole and their maturity characteristics and the growth characteristics exhibited by hybrid cars and smart-phone markets.
• Students also seemed to have some trouble thinking through holistic, comprehensive issues. Recommendations and executive summaries did not really emphasize the most critical factors facing each industry and company

2. Rationale: This SLO is intended to evaluate knowledge and analytical skills of business topics at the point of graduation. The results will help faculty to map the curriculum for required improvements.

3. Changes in assessment: None.

4. Additional resources/budget required: None.

Seven (2011-2017) Years Comparison

Seven Years Results Comparison of Faculty Panel Evaluation:

1. Students performed above 3.8 (75%) on a 5 point Likert scale in general business knowledge from 2010-11 to 2014-15. Student performed around 80% from 2014-15 to Spring 2017.
2. Students performed above 3.7 (75%) on a 5 point Likert scale in general financial knowledge from 2010-11 to 2014-15. Student performed around 84% from 2014-15 to Spring 2017.
3. Students performed above 3.7 (75%) on a 5 point Likert scale in general marketing knowledge from 2011-12 to 2013-14. Student performed around 80% from 2014-15 to Spring 2017.
4. Students performed above 3.8 (75%) on a 5 point Likert scale in general management knowledge from 2010-11 to 2014-15. Student performed around 90% in 2014-15. The students’ performance stayed above 80% from 2014-2015 to Spring 2017.
5 Students performed above 3.8 (75%) on a 5 point Likert scale in external knowledge from 2011-12 to 2014-15. Student performed around 84% from 2014-15 to Spring 2017.

SLO 3 /(G 3): Students should be exposed to professional work experience and on the job training in the business sector.
Means of Program Assessment: School of Business students will go through internship experience. Students in the School of Business are required to take a Business Internship & Seminar course. All students are required to intern with a company and be evaluated using an Intern Performance Review Form.

Criteria for Success 1: Hundred percent (100%) of the School of business students on a 5 point Likert scale will demonstrate communication skills, career planning, and on the-the-job training in the business sector through an internship experience.

Criteria for Success 2: Eighty-five percent (85%) of the School of business students on a 5 point Likert scale demonstrated interpersonal skills, and professional work experience in the business sector through an internship experience.

Course in which SLO is assessed: Bus 450 Business Internship & Seminar.

Results: The data for School of Business majors on communication skills, career planning, and on the-the-job training revealed that the business administration student interns performed above the threshold of 80% (around 90%) in instruction, quality, quantity, planning, communication, teamwork, attendance, and training. The overall results for Accounting, Finance, and Marketing majors were also strong and satisfactory.

The Data Collected on interpersonal skills, and professional work experience reveals that students performed above the 80% threshold in versatility, initiative, judgment, competence, attitude, dependability, and thoroughness. The overall results Finance, and Marketing majors were also strong and satisfactory. The results for Accounting majors were below the other majors (around 85%).

Summary of Assessment Data Collected on supervisor’s satisfaction in communication skills, career planning, and on the-the-job training, Business Administration majors (Number of students: 6):
SLO 1(G3)
Instructions Follow instructions and perform assigned tasks with minimum supervision. 93
Quality Accurately and thoroughly complete assignment. 93
Form Work reflects neatness, attention to detail, and conformity to organizational standards. 90
Quantity Complete assigned tasks and activities on time. 100
Planning Organize and prioritize assignments effectively. 93
Communication Express ideas effectively 86
Teamwork Interact effectively with others. 97
Attendance Regularly attend work, meetings and appointments on time. 97
Training Attendance Participate in scheduled Florida memorial University learning activities. 100
Training Effectiveness Increase competencies and skills as a result of training activities. 97
Average 94%

Summary of Assessment Data Collected on supervisor’s satisfaction interpersonal skills, and professional work experience, Business Administration majors, (Number of students: 6):
SLO 2 (G3)
Presence Project a professional image 86
Versatility Manage ambiguity and uncertainty effectively 90
Initiative Recognize tasks within their sphere of influence and assume responsibility 90
Judgment Solve problems and make appropriate decisions. 90
Competence Adept in completing assignments satisfactorily. 97
Attitude Receptive to feedback and guidance 97
Dependability Reliable 97
Thoroughness Exhibit follow through 97
Average 93%
Summary of Assessment Data Collected on supervisor’s satisfaction in communication skills, career planning, and on the-the-job training, Accounting majors (number of students 6):
SLO 1(G3)
Instructions Follow instructions and perform assigned tasks with minimum supervision. 97
Quality Accurately and thoroughly complete assignment. 93
Form Work reflects neatness, attention to detail, and conformity to organizational standards. 97
Quantity Complete assigned tasks and activities on time. 90
Planning Organize and prioritize assignments effectively. 90
Communication Express ideas effectively 86
Teamwork Interact effectively with others. 93
Attendance Regularly attend work, meetings and appointments on time. 80
Training Attendance Participate in scheduled Florida memorial University learning activities. 97
Training Effectiveness Increase competencies and skills as a result of training activities. 97
Average 92%

Summary of Assessment Data Collected on supervisor’s satisfaction in interpersonal skills, and professional work experience, Accounting majors, (number of students 6):
SLO 2 (G3)
Presence Project a professional image 86
Versatility Manage ambiguity and uncertainty effectively 86
Initiative Recognize tasks within their sphere of influence and assume responsibility 86
Judgment Solve problems and make appropriate decisions. 90
Competence Adept in completing assignments satisfactorily. 86
Attitude Receptive to feedback and guidance 83
Dependability Reliable 86
Thoroughness Exhibit follow through 93
Average 87%
Summary of Assessment Data Collected in on supervisor’s satisfaction communication skills, career planning, and on the-the-job training, Finance majors (number of students 16):
SLO 1(G3)
Instructions Follow instructions and perform assigned tasks with minimum supervision. 94
Quality Accurately and thoroughly complete assignment. 95
Form Work reflects neatness, attention to detail, and conformity to organizational standards. 87
Quantity Complete assigned tasks and activities on time. 91
Planning Organize and prioritize assignments effectively. 87
Communication Express ideas effectively 85
Teamwork Interact effectively with others. 100
Attendance Regularly attend work, meetings and appointments on time. 90
Training Attendance Participate in scheduled Florida memorial University learning activities. 91
Training Effectiveness Increase competencies and skills as a result of training activities. 93
Average 91%
Summary of Assessment Data Collected on supervisor’s satisfaction interpersonal skills, and professional work experience, Finance majors, (number of students 16):
SLO 2 (G3)
Presence Project a professional image 94
Versatility Manage ambiguity and uncertainty effectively 89
Initiative Recognize tasks within their sphere of influence and assume responsibility 94
Judgment Solve problems and make appropriate decisions. 97
Competence Adept in completing assignments satisfactorily. 97
Attitude Receptive to feedback and guidance 94
Dependability Reliable 94
Thoroughness Exhibit follow through 97
Average 95%

Summary of Assessment Data Collected on supervisor’s satisfaction in communication skills, career planning, and on the-the-job training, Marketing majors (number of students 5):
SLO 1(G3)
Instructions Follow instructions and perform assigned tasks with minimum supervision. 94
Quality Accurately and thoroughly complete assignment. 92
Form Work reflects neatness, attention to detail, and conformity to organizational standards. 96
Quantity Complete assigned tasks and activities on time. 88
Planning Organize and prioritize assignments effectively. 88
Communication Express ideas effectively 92
Teamwork Interact effectively with others. 100
Attendance Regularly attend work, meetings and appointments on time. 92
Training Attendance Participate in scheduled Florida memorial University learning activities. 100
Training Effectiveness Increase competencies and skills as a result of training activities. 92
Average 94%

Summary of Assessment Data Collected on supervisor’s satisfaction in interpersonal skills, and professional work experience, Marketing majors, (number of students 5):

SLO 2 (G3)
Presence Project a professional image 96
Versatility Manage ambiguity and uncertainty effectively 92
Initiative Recognize tasks within their sphere of influence and assume responsibility 88
Judgment Solve problems and make appropriate decisions. 96
Competence Adept in completing assignments satisfactorily. 92
Attitude Receptive to feedback and guidance 100
Dependability Reliable 88
Thoroughness Exhibit follow through 84
Average 92%

Use of Results/Action Plan:

1. Use of results to improve program: The faculty who teaches the BUS 450 Business Internship & Seminars needs to develop strategies to maintain and improve students’ internship performance. Inclusion of Mock interviews and invitation of successful business personalities may help to improve the results.

2. Rationale: The employability of students after graduation is an important criteria for the academic and professional success of the School of Business.

3. Changes in assessment: None.

4. Additional resources/budget required: None.

Eight (2010-2017) Years Comparison

SLO 3 /(G 3): Students should be exposed to professional work experience and on the job training in the business sector, Accounting, Business Administration, Finance, and Marketing majors comparison
Means of Program Assessment: Accounting, Business Administration, Finance, and Marketing students will go through internship experience. Students in the majors are required to take a Business Internship & Seminar course. All students are required to intern with a company and be evaluated by their supervisors using an Intern Performance Review Form.

Criteria for Success 1: Eighty percent (100%) of the Accounting, Business Administration, Finance, and Marketing majors on a 5 point Likert scale will demonstrate communication skills, career planning, and on the-the-job training in the business sector through an internship experience. The evaluation is by interns superiors and show their overall satisfaction’s of the interns.

Criteria for Success 2: Eighty-five percent (85%) of the business administration students on a 5 point Likert scale demonstrated interpersonal skills, and professional work experience in the business sector through an internship experience.

Course in which SLO is assessed: Bus 450 Business Internship & Seminar.

Results: The data revealed that the Accounting, Business Administration, Finance, and Marketing majors performed above the threshold of 85% (above 90%,) in communication skills, career planning, and on the-the-job training and students performed close to the threshold of 85% (above %90, 87% for Accounting) in interpersonal skills, and professional work experience in the business sector. The results for Accounting, Finance, and Marketing majors were also strong and satisfactory.

Use of Results/Action Plan:

1. Use of results to improve program: The faculty who teaches the BUS 450 Business Internship & Seminars needs to develop strategies to maintain and improve students’ internship performance. The strategies may include:

* Communications and feedback from the supervisors of the student interns
* Inclusion of work related topics in the course content
* Invitation of guest speakers with Human Resource Management and Professional Development expertise
* Encouraging more students to participate in the School of Business sponsored professional development activities, especially the ones that are organized by the School of Business Advisory Council with specific business theme.

2. Rationale: The employability of students after graduation is an important criteria for the academic and professional development success of the School of Business.

3. Changes in assessment: None.

4. Additional resources/budget required: None.

Students Satisfaction Assessment-Undergraduate By Majors,
Business Administration

First Means of Assessment and Criteria for Success for SLO 1,2,3:

Means of Assessment: School of Business developed a survey to measure Business Administration major alumni satisfaction with professional and career development. Students were asked to choose one of the
flowing:
Strongly Disagree Neutral in Agreement Agree Strongly Agree

Criteria for Success: The Alumni Survey satisfaction results will be greater than 80%.

Course in which SLO is assessed: Survey developed by the School of Business.

Results: The results shows that Business Administration major experience has prepared students moderately to advance in the job market and to receive a pay raise, change career, and getting a better job (71%). They performed below the 80% target of obtain a job promotion (28%).
Business Administration Majors Alumni Satisfaction survey

Use of Results/Action Plan:

1. Use of results to improve program: The School needs to develop strategies to improve the Business Administration alumni professional and career development.
2. Rationale: The alumni satisfaction helps the School of Business in its recruitment, retention, maintenance of its accreditation with the Accreditation Council of Business School od Programs (ACBSP), and fund raising.
3. Changes in assessment: None.
4. Additional resources/budget required: No.
Second Means of Assessment and Criteria for Success for SLO 1,2,3, Business Administration Majors

Means of Assessment: School of Business developed a survey to measure Business Administration major alumni satisfaction with faculty advisement and guidance Students were asked to choose one of the flowing:
Strongly Disagree Neutral in Agreement Agree Strongly Agree

Criteria for Success: The Alumni Survey satisfaction results will be greater than 80%.

Course in which SLO is assessed: Survey developed by the School of Business.

Results: The Business Administration major alumni showed satisfaction (62% strongly agree and 38%
agree) with their faculty advisement and moderate satisfaction (50% strongly agree and 50% agree) with the faculty guidance and responding to their questions.

Business Administration Majors Alumni Satisfaction survey

Use of Results/Action Plan:

1. Use of results to improve program: The faculty need to improve their advisement to Business Administration students to get strong satisfaction by students.
2. Rationale: The alumni satisfaction helps the School of Business in its recruitment, retention, maintenance of its accreditation with the Accreditation Council of Business School od Programs (ACBSP), and fund raising.
3. Changes in assessment: None.
4. Additional resources/budget required: No.

Third Means of Assessment and Criteria for Success for SLO 1,2,3, Business Administration Majors

Means of Assessment: School of Business developed a survey to measure Business Administration major alumni satisfaction with curriculum and faculty qualifications. Students were asked to choose one of the flowing:
Strongly Disagree Neutral in Agreement Agree Strongly Agree

Criteria for Success: The Alumni Survey satisfaction results will be greater than 80%.

Course in which SLO is assessed: Survey developed by the School of Business.

Results: The Business Administration major alumni showed low satisfaction (25% strongly agree and 75% agree) with the demanding curriculum, high satisfaction with faculty qualifications (87% strongly agree, 13% agree), and satisfaction with their preparedness to pursue higher academic degrees after receiving their Business Administration degree (37% strongly Agree, 63% agree).
Business Administration Majors Alumni Satisfaction survey

Use of Results/Action Plan:

1. Use of results to improve program: The survey results have to be used for recruiting of students to the Business Administration Program.
2. Rationale: The alumni satisfaction helps the School of Business in its recruitment, retention,
maintenance of its accreditation with the Accreditation Council of Business School od Programs (ACBSP),
and fund raising.
3. Changes in assessment: None.
4. Additional resources/budget required: No.
Forth Means of Assessment and Criteria for Success for SLO 1,2,3, Business Administration Majors

Means of Assessment: School of Business developed a survey to measure overall Business Administration major alumni satisfaction with the career and academic development as compare to other Business Administration programs. Students were asked to choose one of the flowing:
Strongly Disagree Neutral in Agreement Agree Strongly Agree

Criteria for Success: The Alumni Survey satisfaction results will be greater than 80%.

Course in which SLO is assessed: Survey developed by the School of Business.

Results: The Business Administration majors alumni survey showed students satisfaction (62% strongly agree, 35% agree) with the professional development and lower satisfaction (37% strongly agree and 63% agree) with choosing Florida Memorial Business Administration program.

Business Administration Majors Alumni Satisfaction survey

Use of Results/Action Plan:

1. Use of results to improve program: The survey results have to be used for recruiting of students to the Business Administration program.
2. Rationale: The alumni satisfaction helps the School of Business in its recruitment and fund raising.
3. Changes in assessment: None.
4. Additional resources/budget required: No.

Students Satisfaction Assessment-Undergraduate Salary By Majors, Business Administration
Means of Assessment: School of Business developed a survey to measure alumni salary range and average.
Criteria for Success: The Alumni salary survey results will be compatible with national average salary norm.
Source: data for 2015 are found at http://www.payscale.com/best-colleges/degrees.asp. Median Management major salary for 2015: $42,000.
Course in which SLO is assessed: Survey developed by the School of Business.
Results: The average salary for Business Administration major alumni survey showed that the graduate’s
salary are close or greater to the national norm ($42,000).

Use of Results/Action Plan:
1. Use of results to improve program: The survey results have to be used for recruiting of students to the Business Administration program.
2. Rationale: The alumni satisfaction helps the School of Business in its recruitment and fund raising.
3. Changes in assessment: None.
4. Additional resources/budget required: No.

Finance Fall 2016-Spring 2017 Assessment

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Florida Memorial University Assessment Report
Assessment Cycle 2016-2017
__________________________________________________________________

Degree Program: BS Finance

Completed by: Dr. Cheulho Lee, Associate Professor of Finance, May 2017

I. Degree Program Mission Statement

The mission of the Finance program is to provide students with knowledge of the major concepts and practices of finance, while at the same time helping to develop their analytical and decision-making abilities. The Finance program will prepare students for careers in finance and other business areas, and provide them with the opportunity to pursue graduate studies.

II. Use of Results from Last Assessment Cycle

Changes to Assessment Plan: N/A

Changes to Academic Processes: N/A

Changes to Curriculum:

Changed Implemented
Other changes planned See below for Details

a. Use of Results/Action Plan of the past academic years for SLO 1

2009-2010 Additional emphasis on a review of basic accounting concepts in FIN 323 Corporate Finance class.
Continue to offer study sessions.
2010-2011 Use more real world examples in FIN 323
Continue to offer study sessions.
2011-2012 Additional emphasis on applying theories through real world examples in FIN 323.
Continue to offer study sessions.
2012-2013 Continue to have tutoring sessions.
The area of time value of money will be reviewed in the FIN 323
2013-2014 Continue to have tutoring sessions
The basic concept of valuation to be emphasized
2014-2015 The area of capital budgeting will be covered early in FIN 323

2015-2016 Continue to utilize student tutors

b. Use of Results/Action Plan of the past academic years for SLO 2

2009-2010 More emphasis on intuitive understanding of stochastic in FIN 333 Investments class
More discussions with students about their investment portfolios in FIN 333 and FIN 495.
Additional emphasis on understanding risks of pursuing speculative strategies IN FIN 495.
2010-2011 More emphasis on understanding the difference between short-term vs. long-term investments in FIN 333
Additional emphasis on understanding the intuition behind break-even prices in FIN 495
2011-2012 Continue to offer special study sessions
2012-2013 In the FIN 333 and FIN 495classes, more emphasis on understanding the difference between short-term vs. long-term investments.
More discussions with students about their portfolios.
In the FIN 495, the instructor will emphasize the underlying concepts of break-even prices.

2013-2014 Continue to offer special study sessions
2014-2015 Finance faculty will continue to have more discussions with students about their portfolios.
2015-2016 More emphasis on understanding the difference between short-term vs. long-term investments

c. Use of Results/Action Plan of the past academic years for SLO 3

2009-2010 Students’ future performance in the accounting and marketing areas will be monitored very closely.
2010-2011 The future performance in the areas of accounting, economics and human resources management will be closely monitored.
2011-2012 Continue to advise to motivate students who lack motivation to study.

2012-2013 Advise students to show interest in all the areas in business

2014-2015 Continue to advise students to show interest in all the areas in business

2015-2016 Emphasize the importance of all areas in business

III. Assessment Report

Program Goals

GOAL 1: The Finance program will provide students with knowledge of the major concepts and practices of finance.

GOAL 2: The Finance program will help develop students’ analytical and decision-making abilities.

GOAL 3: The Finance program will prepare students for careers in finance and other business areas, and provide them with the opportunity to pursue graduate studies.

Program Student Learning Outcomes Assessment

SLO 1(GOALs 1 &3): Students will demonstrate knowledge of the major concepts and practices of financial analysis and management and develop analytical decision making skills.
SLO 2 (GOALs 2 &3): Students will demonstrate knowledge of investments and derivatives for the practical application of theory.
SLO 3 (GOAL 3): Students will demonstrate overall knowledge of finance and other major functional areas in business for careers in finance and business, and /or graduate study.

SLO 1

Students will demonstrate knowledge of the major concepts and practices of financial analysis and management and develop analytical decision making skills.

1st Means of Assessment and Criteria for Success: Students will demonstrate proficiency in the Financial Management area of the Business Strategy Game (BSG) simulation. 50% of students will demonstrate better than 50th percentile ranking vs. all simulation players worldwide over the last 12 months in the Financial Management area of the simulation game.

Course in which SLO is assessed: BUS 498 Senior Project class

Results:
a. Results of This Academic Year

2016-2017 FMU Finance Students’ Percentile Ranking vs. ALL Simulation Players Worldwide over the Last 12 Months

(# of participating students worldwide=46,490, Companies=16,781 Schools=418, Countries=36)

Student Worldwide Percentile
Student 1 61
Student 2 77
Student 3 63
Student 4 62
Student 5 77
Student 6 62
Student 7 79
Student 8 77
Student 9 79
Student 10 46
Student 11 62
Student 12 79
Student 13 62
Student 14 61
Student 15 63
Student 16 62
Student 17 79
Student 18 79
Student 19 79

b. Results of Past Academic Years

(1) In the 2016-2017 academic year,

(a) 47% of Finance students (9 students out of 19) scored 70th-79th percentile globally
(b) 47% of Finance students (9 students out of 19) scored 60th -69th percentile globally
(c) 5% of Finance students (1 students out of 19) scored 40th-49th percentile globally

95% of students (18 students out of 19) scored better than 50th percentile ranking globally.
This exceeds the expected criteria for success.

(2) Over the past 8 years, Finance students have exceeded the expected criteria every year except one year (2014-2015 academic year). The performance of our Finance students has been good by the global and national standards.

2nd Means of Assessment and Criteria for Success: The finance portion of the Senior Exit Examination is used. 70% of students are expected to provide correct answers.
Course in which SLO is assessed: BUS 498 Senior Project class
Results:
a. Results of This Academic Year

An Analysis of Finance Area for 2016-2017 Academic Year
Subjects % of students with correct answers (2016-2017)
Time Value of Money 83
Mortgage Loan 67
Present Value 50
Financial Institutions 100
Valuation 67
Derivatives 94
Capital Budgeting 83
Return & Risk 72
Return & Risk 94
Option 89
Average 80

b. Results of Past Academic Years

(1) The 2016-2017 results show that 80% of Finance seniors provide correct answers on average. This performance exceeds the expected criteria for success. A further analysis of 2016-2017 results shows that students did not perform well in the area of pesent value, mortgage loan and valuation. This may be due to the fact that the topics of present value and mortgage loans are covered in FIN 301 principles of Finance class, long before they take Exit Exams.
(2) For the past 8 years, each year more than 70 % of Finance seniors provide correct answers except one year (2015-2016 academic year). On average, Finance students have exceeded the expected criteria for success.

Use of results to improve program/Action Plan for SLO 1

Changes to Assessment Plan: N/A

Changes to Academic Processes: N/A

Changes to Curriculum: other changes planned. See below

(1) Finance faculty will continue to have tutoring sessions. In doing so, Finance faculty will set the time for tutoring sessions after discussing it with students who work full-time, so that they cannot miss the tutoring sessions.

(2) The basic concepts of time value of money will be reviewed in FIN 323.

(3) Student tutors were hired again this year. It seems that these student tutors helped other students a lot. However, tutors need to be hired in a timely fashion. It is recommended that student tutors continue to be utilized in the future.

SLO 2

Students will demonstrate knowledge of investments and derivatives for the practical application of theory.
1st Means of Assessment and Criteria for Success: Stock investment simulation is used. Students use real-time data to invest in stocks using a brokerage account on THINKORSWIM Students start with $200,000.
50% of students are expected to make positive return.

Course in which SLO is assessed: FIN 333 Investments
Results:
a. Results of This Academic Year

2016-2017 Academic Year Results

Rank Return %
Student 1 1.97%
Student 2 1.91%
Student 3 1.04%
Student 4 0.36%
Student 5 0.00%
Student 6 0.00%
Student 7 -0.62%
Student 8 -1.22%
Student 9 -20.81%
Student 10 -35.02%
Student 11 -50%

b. Results of Past Academic Years

(1) In the 2016-2017 academic year, 36% percent of students recorded positive return.
This falls short of the expected criteria for success.

(2) Over the last 8 years, Finance students exceed the expected criteria for success for 5 years.

2nd Means of Assessment and Criteria for Success: Option simulation will be used. Students use real-time data to invest in options using a brokerage account on THINKORSWIM. Students start with $200,000.
50% of students are expected to make positive return.

Course in which SLO is assessed: FIN 495 Futures & Options Markets

Results of Assessments

a. Results of This Academic Year

2016-2017 Academic Year Results

Rank Return %
Student 1 80%
Student 2 56%
Student 3 54%
Student 4 18%
Student 5 16%
Student 6 13%
Student 7 7%
Student 8 6%
Student 9 3%
Student 10 1%
Student 11 0.8%
Student 12 -18%
Student 13 -25%
Student 14 -28%
Student 15 -31%
Student 16 -40%
Student 17 -41%
Student 18 -47%
Student 19 -50%
Student 20 -54%
Student 21 -80%
Student 22 -91%

b. Results of Past Academic Years

(1) In the 2016-2017 academic year, 50% of students recorded positive return. This meets the expected criteria for success.

(2) Over the last 8 years, Finance students have exceeded the expected criteria for success for 3 years.

Use of results to improve program/Action Plan for SLO 2

Changes to Assessment Plan: N/A

Changes to Academic Processes: N/A
Changes to Curriculum: other changes planned. See below

Considering this is the first time for students to make investment in the real world setting, the overall performance is not bad.
An analysis of students’ transactions and discussion reveals the following:

(1) Students have the basic knowledge for investing real money and are able to apply it in the real market.
(2) Because of short-term investment period, students rely more on technical analysis than fundamental analysis.
(3) In the Options project, a few students do not fully understand the underlying concepts behind break-even prices on the expiration date when they use multiple option strategies. Because there are simply too many options to choose from, a few students are too overwhelmed to calculate break-even prices.

Based upon this analysis, Finance faculty will do the following:

(1) In the classes (FIN 333 and FIN 495), more emphasis will continue to be placed upon understanding the difference between short-term vs. long-term investments.
(2) During the project period, finance faculty will continue to have more discussions with students about their portfolios.
(3) Finance faculty will continue to offer special study sessions.

SLO 3

Students will demonstrate overall knowledge of finance and other major functional areas in business for careers in finance and business, and /or graduate study.

1st Means of Assessment and Criteria for Success: Senior Exit Examination is used to test overall knowledge of finance and other areas in business.
50% of students are expected to provide correct answers in each area of senior exit examination.

Course in which SLO is assessed: BUS 498 Senior Project class

Results:

a. Results of This Academic Year

% of Finance Students with Correct Answers in Senior Exit Exam
2016-2017 Academic Year

Management 57
Finance 80
Accounting 33
Marketing 58
Economics 57
Mean 57
# of Students 19

b. Results of Past Academic Years

(1) In the 2016-2017 academic year, more than 50% of Finance seniors provide correct answers in all the areas except accounting.
(2) Over the last 8 years, Finance seniors have performed the best in the Finance area. For the same period, the performance of the accounting area has been below the expected criteria.

2nd Means of Assessment and Criteria for Success: Students will demonstrate proficiency in the Business Strategy Game (BSG) simulation.
On average, 50% of students will demonstrate better than 50th percentile ranking vs. all simulation players worldwide over the last 12 months in each business area.
Course in which SLO is assessed: BUS 498 Senior Project class
Results:
a. Results of This Academic Year

(# of participating students worldwide=46,490, Companies=16,781 Schools=418, Countries=36)

STUDENT Analytical Skills FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT MARKETING MANAGEMENT HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT STRATEGIC ANALYSIS & PLANNING CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY
Student 1 89 61 82 13 93 16 55
Student 2 100 77 41 94 76 73 12
Student 3 54 63 22 40 84 73 64
Student 4 72 62 48 75 82 41 54
Student 5 89 77 41 94 76 73 12
Student 6 72 62 48 75 82 41 54
Student 7 100 79 64 91 2 73 50
Student 8 89 77 41 94 76 73 12
Student 9 100 79 64 91 2 73 50
Student 10 72 46 37 21 37 43 57
Student 11 72 62 48 75 82 41 54
Student 12 100 79 64 91 2 73 50
Student 13 54 62 48 75 82 41 54
Student 14 54 61 82 13 93 16 55
Student 15 89 63 22 40 84 73 64
Student 16 89 62 48 75 82 41 54
Student 17 100 79 64 91 2 73 50
Student 18 100 79 64 91 2 73 50
Student 19 100 79 64 91 2 73 50
Mean 84 69 52 70 55 57 47
% Above 50th Percentile 100 95 42 74 63 58 84

b. Results of Past Academic Years

(1) In the 2016-2017 academic year, Finance students performed better than 50th percentile globally in all areas except Operation Management.

(2) Over the last 8 years, analytical skills, human resources management areas show relatively poor performance. Except these areas, Finance students’ overall performance has been good by the global and national standard over the last 6 years. Students performed well in analytical skills area this year.

Use of results to improve program/Action Plan for SLO 3

Encourage students to show more interest in areas other than finance area.

Changes to Assessment Plan: N/A

Changes to Academic Processes: N/A

Changes to Curriculum: other changes planned. See below

IV. Program Highlights

1. Participation in FMU Experiential Learning, Research and Performing Arts Day Presentation in April 2016

• Jordan Cannon (Finance junior) “A Comparative Du Pont Analysis of General Mills, Inc. and Kellog Company”, received the 1st place award (Mentor: Dr. Cheulho Lee).

• Sanjay Lyew (Finance junior) “A Comparative Du Pont Analysis of Publix Super Markets, Inc. and Whole Foods Market, Inc “ received 1st place award. (Mentor: Dr. Cheulho Lee).

• Federico Blumberg (Finance senior) “An Industry and Company Analysis of NIKE Inc.” received 1st place award. (Mentor: Dr. Cheulho Lee).

• Ruben Sanchez (Finance senior) “A Comparative Du Pont Analysis of Dell Inc. and HP Inc”. received 1st place award. (Mentor: Dr. Cheulho Lee).

• Khalil Knowles (Finance junior) “An Industry and Company Analysis of General Motors Company”, received the 1st place award (Mentor: Dr. Cheulho Lee).

• Rashad Russell (Finance junior) “An Industry and Company Analysis of American Airlines Group Inc.” received the 1st place award (Mentor: Dr. Cheulho Lee).

2. International Honor Societies Induction and Star Chapter Award for Delta Mu Delta

• 6 Finance juniors and seniors were inducted into Financial Management Association International Honor Society.(Advisor: Dr. Cheulho Lee)

• 6 Finance juniors and seniors were inducted into Delta Mu Delta International Honor Society. (Advisor: Dr. Cheulho Lee).

• We received the Delta Mu Delta Star Chapter Award for 5 years in a row. FMU Delta Mu Delta Chapter is one of 22 STAR chapters for 2016-2017 academic year, chosen from over 300+ DMD chapters. The STAR award sets our students apart from DMD members at over 300+ DMD chapters.

3. Guest Speaker

Invited Mr. Patrick Manning Patrick Manning, former President of Manufactures Hanover Securities Corporation, to discuss “ Careers on Wall Street” , Fall 2016

4. Bloomberg Market Concepts (BMC)

Bloomberg Market Concepts (BMC) is an 8 hour self-paced e-learning course that provides a visual introduction to the financial markets. BMC consists of 4 modules – Economics, Currencies, Fixed Income and Equities – woven together from Bloomberg data, news, analytics and television. By taking BMC, learners familiarize themselves with the industry standard service through four heavily interconnected modules.

This year, 5 students passed BMC and received the certificates.

5. UNCF/Bloomberg Terminal Usage Enhancement Initiative

We hired student tutors to help other students use the Bloomberg terminal. These student tutors were rigorously trained by Dr. Lee before tutoring other students. Bloomberg has become an integral part of Finance program.

6. Community Service

12 Finance students, along with Dr. Lee and Ms. Benjamin, participated in the Seventh Annual Community Health Awareness Day, sponsored by Triumph the Church, Kingdom of God in Christ, and National Black Police Association in April 2016

7. Academic Excellence

• Federico Blumberg(2017 Finance graduate) received the Academic Excellence Award in 2017 Commencement ceremony for graduating with the highest GPA among all FMU graduates.

• 4 Finance graduate have received the Academic Teaching Excellence Award in a Commencement ceremony since we produced the first ever Finance graduates in 2007.

• In the 2017 commencement ceremony, 8 finance student graduated with Summa Cum Laude and 4 students with Magna Cum Laude, and 4 students with Cum Laude.

Marketing Assessment 2016-2017

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Florida Memorial Assessment Spring 2016-Fall 2017

Degree Program Title: BS Marketing

Completed by: William Lucky

I. Degree Program Mission Statement

Mission of the Marketing Program
The mission of the Marketing program is to provide students with an understanding of the basic structures and processes of marketing and assist them in developing the ability to analyze and deal with marketing problems and opportunities. The program prepares students for careers in marketing and provides them the opportunity to pursue graduate studies. The Marketing program is intended to provide the students with necessary skills for performance of assigned duties in the fields of:

1. Marketing Management
2. Marketing Research
3. Personal/Industrial Sales
4. Retail Management
5. E-Commerce
6. Supply Chain Management

II. Use of Results from Last Assessment Cycle

What changes did you make to your program? No substantial changes were made to the Marketing program during the 2016-2017 academic year. However, the newly approved Supply Chain Management course was taught during the Spring 2016 semester. This is primarily a Marketing course but it is open to all business majors and can be substituted for Operations Research (BUS 420).

III. Assessment Report

Program Goals

Upon completion of the program students will:

1. Demonstrate the knowledge and skills necessary for the application of marketing technology within an organization.
2. Demonstrate the marketing skills necessary to facilitate the creation of successful marketing policies within a firm.
3. Demonstrate the abilities to conduct research, analyze data and report results through utilization of the latest marketing information and techniques.
4. Demonstrate the ability to development creative solutions to marketing problems within an organization.

Student Learning Outcomes Assessment (SLOs)

1. Students will understand, and be able to communicate, basic marketing principles and the fundamentals for successful retailing management, product and services marketing, electronic commerce, advertising, channel structure, and personal selling in order to effectively market themselves and the organization they represent.

2. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the fundamentals of consumer behavior and be able to perform a conceptual analysis of consumer behavior individually, within a general retailing, or industrial personal selling context.

3. Students will demonstrate an understanding of current issues in marketing, there application in marketing contexts, and fundamental techniques of marketing research.

SLO 1/(Goals 2,3,and 4): Students will understand, and be able to communicate, basic marketing principles and the fundamentals for successful retailing management, product and service marketing, electronic commerce, advertising, channel structure, and personal selling in order to effectively market themselves and the organization they represent.

First means of assessment: (1) All students fundamental knowledge of marketing principles and concepts relating to retailing management, product and services marketing, electronic commerce, advertising, channel structure, and personal selling was assessed in two courses using vocabulary quizzes and content/concept quizzes. The vocabulary quizzes primarily focused on the marketing lexicon while the content/concept quizzes focused primarily on the conceptual understanding of basic marketing theory.

Criteria for Success: Seventy percent (70%) of the students will demonstrate fundamental knowledge of marketing principles and concepts relating to retailing management, product and services marketing, electronic commerce, advertising, channel structure, and personal selling, by scoring an average of 70% or higher.

Course in which SLO is assessed: Principles of Marketing (MAR 301) and Retailing Management (MAR 361).

Results:

Principles of Marketing (MAR 301): – Vocabulary Quizzes:

Based on the average students score across all areas covered, only 3.13% of the students scored 70% or higher on the vocabulary quizzes. Actual average student performance scores ranged from 2.49 to 90.32 (on a 100 point scale). Results indicate that, in those areas assessed, average student performance did not meet the minimum criteria for success across all the areas covered (see graph below). This analysis was based on 32 students.

Student performance on vocabulary quizzes was also assessed by examining the average score within each area covered. Results indicate that the average vocabulary score, within each area covered, did not meet the 70% criteria level. Actual average student performance scores in the areas covered ranged from 22.5 to 53.28 (on a 100 point scale) (see graph below).

Student performance on vocabulary quizzes was further assessed by examining the range of scores in each of the areas covered. Results indicate that scores ranged from 0% to 100%. This indicates that some students performed very well while others need to improve their performance (see graph below).

A more detailed analysis, of the actual percentage of students that scored over 70% on the vocabulary quizzes, indicates that students did not perform as well as expected within all areas covered. With the exception of one area, the percent of students scoring 70% or greater across the areas covered range from 12.5 to 37.5 percent (see graph below). From these results, it is clear that some students are doing very well when it comes to learning the material but, overall, student performance is below the 70 percent level.

Narrative: In terms of overall performance in the class, seventy percent of the class did not meet the minimum criteria of 70% across all the areas assessed. Only 3.125% of the class met the performance criteria across all the areas assessed. Overall individual student scores ranged from 5.17 to 90.32. The average student score was 37.20 with a sample standard deviation of 21.57. This indicates a non-trivial amount of variation in student scores.

Looking within each area assessed, 70% of the class did not meet the minimum criteria of 70%. Within each of the areas covered, scores ranged from 22.5 to 53.28 with the average class score being 36.11 with a standard deviation of 9.26. This shows low variation in the scores indicating that student scores were close to the mean. Further, the individual student performance scores ranged from 0 to 100%. The standard deviations for each of the areas assessed ranged from 24.52 to 47.63. The range of student scores explains the high variation in student scores across the areas covered. This should be expected given that this was a Principle of Marketing course.

Principles of Marketing (MAR 301) – Content/Concept Quizzes:

Based on the average students score across all areas covered, only 2.95% of the students scored 70% or higher on the content/concept quizzes. Actual average student performance scores ranged from 7.69 to 84.62 (on a 100 point scale). Results indicate that, across those areas covered, average student performance did not meet the minimum performance criteria (see graph below). This analysis was based on 34 students.

Student performance on content/concept quizzes was also assessed by examining the average score within each area covered. Results indicate that within each area covered, the average student’s content/concept score did not meet the 70% performance criteria. Actual average student performance scores ranged from 29.85 to 61.03 (on a 100 point scale) (see graph below).

Student performance on content/concept quizzes was further assessed by examining the range of scores in each of the areas covered. Results indicate that scores ranged from 0% to 100% (see graph below). This demonstrates that some students were meeting the performance goal but the majority were not meeting the performance goals.

A more detailed analysis, of the actual percentage of students that scored over 70% on the content/concept quizzes, indicates that students did not perform as well as expected across all areas covered. The percent of students scoring 70% or greater within the areas covered range from 11.76 to 47.06 percent (see graph below).

Narrative: In terms of overall performance in the class, seventy percent of the class did not meet the minimum performance criteria of 70% across all the areas assessed. Only 2.95% of the class met the performance criteria across all the areas assessed. Individual student scores ranged from 4.62 to 77.31. The average student score was 43.96 with a standard deviation of 22.91.

Looking within each area assessed, 70% of the class did not meet the minimum criteria of 70%. Within each of the areas covered, the average student score was 42.79 with a standard deviation of 9.98. Average class scores, within each area covered, ranged from 29.85 to 61.03. Further, the individual student performance scores ranged from 0 to 100%. The standard deviations for each of the areas assessed ranged from 23.91 to 39.39 indicating a significant amount of variation in the scores. This level of variation in student scores is expected given the range of student scores.

Retailing Marketing (MAR 361): Vocabulary Quizzes

Based on the average students score across all areas covered, none of the students scored 70% or higher on the vocabulary quizzes. Actual average student performance scores ranged from 7.47 to 28.62 (on a 100 point scale). Results indicate that, in those areas covered, average student performance did not meet the minimum criteria for success. This analysis was based on 5 students.

Student performance on vocabulary quizzes was also assessed by examining the average score within each area covered. Results indicate that the average vocabulary score, within each area covered, did not meet the 70% criteria level. Actual average student performance scores, ranged from 0 to 64 (on a 100 point scale) (see graph below).

Student performance on vocabulary quizzes was also assessed by examining the range of scores in each of the areas covered. Results indicate that scores ranged from 0% to 100%. This indicates that some students were performing well while others were falling short of the performance criteria (see graph below).

A more detailed analysis, of the actual percentage of students that scored 70% or over on the vocabulary quizzes, indicates that students did not perform as expected across all areas covered. The percent of students scoring 70% or greater across the areas covered range from 0 to 60 percent (see graph below).

Narrative: In terms of overall performance in the class, seventy percent of the class did not meet the minimum criteria of 70% across all the areas covered. Specifically, 0% of the class met the performance criteria across all the areas assessed. The average student score was 17.45 with a sample standard deviation of 9.82. The individual student scores, across all areas covered, ranged from 5.17 to 90.32. (Note: on many occasions, students were absent when the quiz was given).

Looking within each area covered, 70% of the class did not meet the minimum criteria of 70%. Within each of the areas covered, average scores ranged from 0 to 64 with the class average score being 17.45 with a standard deviation of 24.80. Further, the individual student performance scores ranged from 0 to 100%. The standard deviations for each of the areas covered ranged from 0 to 46.04 with an average standard deviation of 12.32. Given the range in student scores, a significant amount of variation in the scores is expected.

Retailing Marketing (MAR 361): Content/Concept Quizzes

Based on the average students score across all areas covered, 70% of the students scored 70% or higher on the content/concept quizzes. Actual average student performance scores ranged from 81.50 to 92.31 (on a 100 point scale). Results indicate that average student performance met the minimum performance criteria for success across all the areas covered. This analysis was based on 4 students.

Student performance on content/concept quizzes was also assessed by examining the average score, within each area covered. Results indicate that the student’s average content/concept score, met or exceeded the 70% criteria level in all but one area. Actual average student performance scores, within each area covered, ranged from 56.67 to 100 (on a 100 point scale) (see graph below).

Student performance on content/concept quizzes was also assessed by examining the range of scores in each of the areas covered. Results indicate that scores ranged from 0% to 100% (see graph below). Looking at the actual performance scores, the range between the lowest and highest scores is not that pronounced. This would seem to indicate that, some students were learning the material well while others were also learning the material but not quite to the 70% proficiency level.

A more detailed analysis, of the actual percentage of students that scored over 70% on the vocabulary quizzes, indicates that students performed well across all areas covered. The percent of students scoring 70% or greater across the areas covered range from 50 to 75 percent (see graph below).

Narrative: In terms of overall performance in the class, 70% of the class met the minimum criteria of 70% across all the areas covered. In fact, 100% of the class met the performance criteria across all the areas assessed. The individual student scores, across all areas covered, ranged from 81.53 to 92.31 with an average score of 88.21 and a standard deviation of 5.82. The high average student score and the low amount of variation indicates that students performed well in this area of the course.

Looking within each area covered, 70% of the class did meet the minimum criteria of 70%. Within each of the areas covered, average scores ranged from 56.70 to 100 with the class average score being 88.21 with a standard deviation of 11.19. Further, the individual student performance scores ranged from 0 to 100%. The standard deviations for each of the areas covered ranged from 0 to 49.32 with an average standard deviation of 14.87. Given this low amount of variation, student averages were close to the mean. Based on these results, students are doing well in the course.

Use of Results/Action Plan:
1. Use of results to improve program: Student performance in Principles of Marketing (MAR 301) did not meet the 70 percent criteria across or within the subject areas covered. Individual student performance shows a considerable amount of variation in student scores. This points to the fact that some students are performing very well while others are not meeting the performance criteria. Given the reality that this is an interdisciplinary course (i.e., taken by all business students), the pattern of results should be expected.

Student performance in Retailing Management (MAR 361) demonstrates that the students are doing well. More than 70 percent of the class met the 70% performance criteria for the content/concept quizzes. Student results on the vocabulary section can be attributed to attendance. The vocabulary quizzes are given at the beginning of the class (i.e., first 15 – 20 minutes) and some students miss these quizzes. There is no makeup for these quizzes. These results point to the fact that, within the Marketing major, students are performing well.

Poor student performance can also be attributed to the fact that many of them do not read and study the material before coming to class. During the semester, several of the students did not have the textbook at any time. In discussions with students concerning their preparation for the quizzes, many of them stated that they spent minimal time with the material (note: several reasons were given for the dearth of time spent with the class material. To aid students in gaining access to course material, some of the course material (i.e., textbook) will be put on reserve in the library.
2. Rationale: Given the nature of the vocabulary quizzes, access to course material is paramount for students to do well. Vocabulary is a significant component of the foundation of the marketing major and students lacking this foundation have trouble grasping marketing theory. Thus, in order to maximize student learning it is imperative that students gain a strong foundation in the marketing lexicon.
3. Changes in assessment: No changes.
4. Additional resources/budget required: Access to funds to take students off campus to specific business locations (both consumer and industrial) to meet with industry professionals would be great. This, would enhance the educational experience of the students by providing them with a real world context in which to understand and interpret marketing theory and practice.

Second Means of Assessment: All marketing majors understanding of retailing management principles and concepts was also assessed via a formal research paper in the Retailing Management (MAR 361) courses. During the semester, students were to develop the front end of a research paper which included an introduction, a literature review, and a reference section. A major aspect of the introduction was the development of a concise research question, while a major aspect of the literature review section was the development of a testable hypothesis or hypotheses. This measured the depth of student knowledge related to general marketing and retailing marketing concepts.

Course in which SLO is assessed: Retailing Management (MAR 361)

Criteria for Success: Seventy percent (70%) of the marketing students will demonstrate knowledge of retailing marketing principles and concepts, by scoring at least 70% on all areas of the research paper rubric. The rubric for the paper measured the student’s proficiency in articulating their introduction (including the research question), literature review (including hypotheses), and reference section.

Results: Results for Retailing Marketing (MAR361) indicate that student performance met the minimum criteria (70%) in only one of the main areas. Students did well at writing the introduction and expressing their research question (see graph below). However, when it came to writing the literature review and articulating a testable hypothesis, only 20 percent of the students could perform that aspect. Half of the students could properly cite their sources using APA style. Overall the students did a good job in this area but some errors were present in their work.

Retailing Marketing (MAR 361)

Substantive Areas Percent of Students Meeting Criteria Minimum Criteria (75% of Total Points) Total Points per Section
General Introduction 75 27 35
Literature Review 20 38 50
References 50 12 15

Use of Results/Action Plan:
1. Use of results to improve program: Student overall performance on the research paper in Retailing Management (MAR 361) did not meet the 70 percent performance criteria. Students performed well on the introduction section but did not do as well on the literature review or reference sections. Individually, some students did perform well, but as a group there is room for improvement. Since marketing students are first introduced to this skill in the retailing course, poor performance must be assessed in light of this reality. Nonetheless, the results indicate that students did not have the necessary skills to write the front end of a formal research paper. As a result, this skill will be taught to students in the first two weeks of class. For marketing majors, this skill will be reinforced in the consumer behavior and marketing research courses. Thus, student performance should improve because the fundamentals will already be in place.
2. Rationale: Whether displayed formally, in writing, or demonstrated via a personal selling simulation, the ability to develop a concise method for looking at marketing phenomena and developing practical applications is a critical skill for any marketing students. It is unlikely that without being able to state a potential problem or opportunity in concise terms that it will be possible to conceive a plan of action to rectify the problem or capitalize on the opportunity.
3. Changes in assessment: To improve student performance related to citation, students will be required to demonstrate that they have access to an APA style guide. Further, all students will be required to use citation software in the library. Moreover, although a deadline was given for turning in the initial draft many of the students did not meet the deadline. As a result, all deadlines, pertaining to the research paper, will be given a point value that will count for a portion of the overall (final) grade. This should aid in student compliance in meeting the deadlines specified by the professor.
4. Additional resources/budget required: Access to funds to take students off campus to specific retailing locations to meet with industry professionals, would enhance the educational experience of the students. The ability to see firsthand how a retailing strategy is implemented and how the performance measures are developed and assessed would greatly fortify the theoretical knowledge the students receive in class.

SLO 2/(Goals 2, 3, and 4): Students should understand the fundamentals of consumer behavior and be able to perform a conceptual analysis of consumer behavior individually, within a general retailing or industrial personal selling context.

First Means of Assessment: All marketing majors understanding of the fundamentals of consumer behavior was assessed using vocabulary quizzes and content/concept quizzes. The vocabulary quizzes primarily focused on the marketing lexicon while the content/concept quizzes focused primarily on the conceptual understanding of basic marketing, retailing management, and personal selling theory.

Course in which SLO is assessed: Consumer Behavior (MAR 395) and Personal Selling (MAR 362)

Criteria for Success: Seventy percent (70%) of the marketing students will demonstrate fundamental knowledge of consumer behavior principles and concepts, by scoring an average of 70% or higher.

Results:

Consumer Behavior (MAR 361): Vocabulary Quizzes

Based on the average students score across all areas covered, none of the students scored 70% or higher on the vocabulary quizzes. Actual average student performance scores ranged from 15.38 to 45.62 (on a 100 point scale). Results indicate that, in those areas assessed, average student performance did not meet the minimum criteria for success across all the areas covered. This analysis was based on 6 students.

Student performance on vocabulary quizzes was also assessed by examining the average score within each area covered. Results indicate that the average student vocabulary score, within each area covered, did not meet the 70% criteria level. Actual average student performance scores, ranged from 26.68 to 82.5 percent (on a 100 point scale) (see graph below).

Student performance on vocabulary quizzes was also assessed by examining the range of scores in each of the areas covered. Results indicate that scores ranged from 0% to 100%. (see Graph Below)

A more detailed analysis, of the actual percentage of students that scored over 70% on the vocabulary quizzes, indicates that students did not perform as well as expected across all areas covered. The percent of students scoring 70% or greater across the areas covered range from 0 to 57.14 percent (see graph below).

Narrative: In terms of overall performance in the class, 70% of the class did not meet the minimum performance criteria of 70% across all the areas covered. 0% of the class met the performance criteria across all the areas assessed. The individual student scores ranged from 15.37 to 45.62 with an average score of 31.84 and a standard deviation of 11.63. Given the modest amount of variation in student scores, most scores cluster around the mean indicating students performed similarly in this aspect of the course.

Looking within each area covered, 70% of the class did meet the minimum criteria of 70%. Within each of the areas covered, average scores ranged from 26.68 to 82.5 with the class average of score being 60.86. Further, the individual student performance scores ranged from 0 to 100%. The standard deviations for each of the areas covered ranged from 11.93 to 51.16 with an average standard deviation of 27.62. Given the range of student scores, and the non-trivial amount variation, some students seem to be performing very well while others are not performing well.

Content/Concept Quizzes

Based on the average students score across all areas covered, 83.33 of the students scored 70% or higher on the content/concept quizzes. Actual average student performance scores ranged from 25.87 to 93.33 percent (on a 100 point scale). Results indicate that, in those areas assessed, average student performance met the minimum criteria for success across all the areas covered. This analysis was based on 6 students.

Student performance on content/concept quizzes was also assessed by examining the average score within each area covered. Results indicate that the students average content/concept score, within each area covered, met the 70% criteria level. Actual average student performance scores, within each area covered, ranged from 75 to 97 (on a 100 point scale) (see graph below). This indicates that students are doing well in this measurement area.

Student performance on content/concept quizzes was also assessed by examining the range of scores in each of the areas covered. Results indicate that scores ranged from 45 to 95% (see graph below).

A more detailed analysis, of the actual percentage of students that scored over 70% on the content/concept quizzes, indicates that students performed well across all areas covered. The percent of students scoring 70% or greater across the areas covered range from 57.14 to 85.71 percent (see graph below).

Narrative: In terms of overall performance in the class, 70% of the class met the minimum criteria of 70% across all the areas covered. In fact, 88% of the class met the performance criteria across all the areas assessed. The individual student scores ranged from 25.89 to 93.33 with an average score of 82.92 and a standard deviation of 5.91. The high average student score and the low amount of variation indicates that students performed well in this area of the course.

Looking within each area covered, 70% of the class did meet the minimum criteria of 70%. Within each of the areas covered, average scores ranged from 75 to 97 with the class average of score being 88.45. Further, the individual student performance scores ranged from 45 to 100%. The standard deviations for each of the areas covered ranged from 2.74 to 22.64 with an average standard deviation of 10.30. Given the narrow range of student scores and the low amount of variation, student averages were close to the mean. Students are doing well in this section of the course.

Use of Results/Action Plan:
1. Use of results to improve program: Student performance in Consumer Behavior (MAR 395) on the vocabulary quizzes did not meet the 70 percent criteria across or within the subject areas covered. Individual student performance shows a considerable amount of variation in student scores. This points to the fact that some students are performing very well while others are not meeting the performance criteria. However, these results may not be indicative of actual student performance. Student results on the vocabulary section can be attributed to attendance. The vocabulary quizzes are given at the beginning of the class (i.e., first 15 – 20 minutes) and some students miss these quizzes. There is no makeup for these quizzes.

Student performance for the content/concept quizzes shows students are doing well. More than 70 percent of the class met the 70% performance criteria for the content/concept quizzes. Student performance in this area exceeds the minimum criterion so no structural changes are necessary. However, to maintain this performance level, students will be encouraged to spend more quality time with the course material.
1. Rationale: The students are doing well in this area but performance can be increased. The goal is to improve student performance to the point where 90 percent of students exceed to minimum criterion level.
2. Changes in assessment: No change.
3. Additional resources/budget required: Access to funds to take students off campus to specific retailing locations to meet with industry/marketing professionals, would enhance the educational experience of the students. The ability to see, and discuss, firsthand how consumer behavior theory impacts marketing strategy and how that strategy is implemented, assessed, and augmented would greatly fortify the theoretical knowledge the students receive in class.

Consumer Behavior (MAR 395): Research Paper and Personal Selling Presentation

Second Means of Assessment: (1) All marketing majors conceptual understanding of consumer behavior individually, within a general retailing or industrial personal selling context was also assessed via a formal research paper. The rubric for the paper assessed the student’s proficiency in articulating their general introduction (including the research question), literature review, and hypothesis development.

(2) All marketing majors conceptual understanding of consumer behavior individually, within a general retailing or industrial personal selling context was also assessed via a formal personal selling presentation. The rubric for the personal sales presentation assessed student performance in accordance with: appearance, approach, warm-up, presentation, knowledge, questions, demonstrations, objections, close, and flow.

Criteria for Success: Seventy percent (70%) of the marketing students will understand the fundamentals of consumer behavior and be able to perform a conceptual analysis of consumer behavior individually, within a general retailing or industrial personal selling context, by scoring 70% or higher on all areas of the consumer behavior research paper rubric.

Course in which SLO is assessed: Consumer Behavior (MAR 395)

Results: Consumer Behavior (MAR 395) – Research Paper

Results for Consumer Behavior (MAR 395) indicate that student performance met the minimum criteria (70%) in the areas assessed. Students were able to write the introduction and express a concise research question. Although student performance on the literature review section was satisfactory, there is still room for improvement for hypothesis development. Further, students were able to compile the proper information for their reference section, but they need to focus more on the punctuation requirements for citation using APA style.

Substantive Areas Percent of Students Meeting Criteria
Minimum Criteria (70% of Total)

Total Points per Section
General Introduction (with Research Question)
85.70
24.5
35
Literature Review (Includes Testable Hypothesis)
71.43
35.0
50
References (APA Style) 71.43 10.5 15
n = 7

Criteria for Success: Seventy percent (70%) of the marketing students will understand the fundamentals of consumer behavior and be able to perform a conceptual analysis of consumer behavior individually, within a general retailing or industrial personal selling context, by scoring 70% or higher on all areas of the personal selling presentation rubric.

Course in which SLO is assessed: Personal Selling (MAR 362)

Results: Personal Selling (MAR 362) – Personal Selling Presentation

Based on the average students score across all areas covered, 100% of the students scored 70% or higher. Actual average student performance scores ranged from 77.0 to 94.0 (on a 100 point scale). Results indicate that, in those areas assessed, average student performance did meet the minimum criteria for success across all the areas covered (see graph below). This analysis was based on 12 students.

Student performance on the personal selling presentation was also assessed by examining the average score within each area covered. Results indicate that the students average score, within each area covered, met the 70% criteria level. Actual average student performance scores, within each area covered, ranged from 81.67 to 95 (on a 100 point scale) (see graph below).

Student performance on the personal selling presentation was also assessed by examining the range of scores in each of the areas covered. Results indicate that scores ranged from 40.0 to 100% (see graph below).

A more detailed analysis, of the actual percentage of students that scored over 70% on each section of the personal selling presentation, indicates that students performed well across all areas covered. The percent of students scoring 70% or greater across the areas covered range from 57.14 to 85.71 percent (see graph below).

Narrative: Student overall performance on the research paper in Retailing Management (MAR 361) did not meet the 70 percent performance criteria. Students performed well on all sections being assessed.

In terms of overall class performance on the personal selling presentation, 100% of the class met the minimum criteria of 70% across all the areas assessed. Overall individual student scores ranged from 77.0 to 94.0 with an average student score of 85.91 and sample standard deviation of 5.58.

Looking within each area assessed, 100% of the class met the minimum criteria of 70%. Within each of the areas assessed, scores ranged from 81.67 to 95.0 with the average class score being 86.72 with a standard deviation of 4.01. Further, the individual student performance scores ranged from 0 to 100% while the standard deviations for each of the areas assessed ranged from 0.453 to 1.71. There seems to be very little variation across scores which indicates that student performance scores were consistent across students.

Use of Results/Action Plan:
1. Use of results to improve program: Student performance on the research paper for Consumer Behavior (MAR 395) demonstrates that students are meeting the performance criteria. 100% of the students met the 70 percent performance criteria across all the areas covered. Thus, students were able to select a topic and design the front end of a research paper to study the issue.

Student performance on the personal selling (MAR 362) presentation demonstrates that students are performing well. 100% of the students met the performance criteria across all areas covered. This indicates that students are capable of giving a sales presentation in a consumer or industrial sales setting.

Student performance in these areas exceeds the minimum criterion so no structural changes are necessary. However, to maintain this performance level, students will be encouraged to spend more quality time with the course material.
2. Rationale: The students are doing well in this area but performance can be increased. The goal is to improve student performance to the point where 90 percent of students exceed to minimum criterion level.
3. Changes in assessment: No change.
4. Additional resources/budget required: Access to funds to take students off campus to specific retailing locations to meet with industry/marketing professionals, would enhance the educational experience of the students. The ability to see, and discuss, firsthand how consumer behavior is integral to the process of personal selling. In addition, students would be able to see how personal selling is actual done and how it fits into overall marketing strategy. It would also give students the ability to discuss how that strategy is implemented, assessed, and augmented would greatly fortify the theoretical knowledge the students receive in class.

SLO 3/(Goals 1, 2, 3, and 4): Students should demonstrate an understanding of current issues in marketing, there application in marketing contexts, and fundamental techniques of marketing research.

First Means of Assessment: All marketing majors understanding of the fundamentals of marketing research was assessed using a formal research paper. Students are required to develop a formal research paper based on a topic they are given (i.e., special research topic) or on a topic they choose within the conceptual boundaries of the marketing courses they have taken. The paper had to include an introduction (including the research question), a literature review (including hypotheses), a methodology section (including a research instrument). In addition, students had to demonstrate their research abilities by collecting, entering, and analyzing data, reporting the results, discussing the results, providing managerial implications and compiling their references (including appendices). The quality of the paper was assessed using a rubric measuring each major section.

Criteria for Success: Seventy (70%) of the marketing students will demonstrate an understanding of the fundamental techniques of marketing research, by scoring 70% in all areas on the research paper rubric.

Course in which SLO is assessed: Marketing Research (MAR 495)

Results: The research topic selected for the paper was provided by the instructor thus falling under the special topic category. As a result, all students worked on the research paper as a group. Hence, student performance represents the overall evaluation of the final project where each individual student receives the same points in accordance with performance on the areas assessed (see chart below). Results indicate that student performance met or exceeded the performance criteria in all but one area assessed.

Major Areas Assessed
Student Performance Minimum Criteria (70%) Total Points Available
Introduction 80 7 10
Literature Review 70 14 20
Methodology 75 14 20
Results 85 14 20
Discussion 90 10.5 15
Managerial Applications 70 7 10
References 60 3.5 5

Overall Performance

100

Use of Results/Action Plan:
1. Use of results to improve program: Student performance in this area exceeds the performance criterion in all but one area. Thus, no structural changes are necessary. However, to maintain this performance level, students will be encouraged to pay closer attention to the guidelines established for each area assessed.
2. Rationale: The students are doing well in this area but performance can be increased. The goal is to improve student performance beyond the minimum performance criteria.
3. Changes in assessment: No change
4. Additional resources/budget required: Access to funds to take students off campus to specific locations to meet with marketing research professionals, would enhance the educational experience of the students. The ability to see, and discuss, firsthand aspects of marketing research specifically in relation to how research projects are implemented and assessed would greatly fortify the theoretical knowledge the students receive in class.

IV. Program Highlights

Marketing majors’ proficiency in the discipline is measured via general vocabulary quizzes, content/concept quizzes, presentations, and research papers. The vocabulary quizzes are designed to assess student progress in understanding the general marketing lexicon while the content/concept quizzes are designed to gage student knowledge of basic theoretical constructs and their applications. These quizzes are representative of the breadth of knowledge the students are exposed to and, thus, their performance can be seen as an indicator of how well the students have internalized the information. Presentations are designed to gage the student’s ability to present information to a target market while the research papers are designed to examine the depth of student knowledge in a particular area of marketing and the student’s ability to do quality research.

Vocabulary Quizzes: In general, the assessment criterion was that 70 percent of the students would score 70 percent or better in the areas assessed. Results indicate that student performance on vocabulary quizzes did not meet minimum performance criteria. Results:
a. Principles of Marketing (MAR 301): 3.12 percent of the students scored 70 percent or better across all areas covered with an average class score of 37.20. Within the areas covered, the percent of students that met the 70% performance criteria ranged from 12.5 to 37.5 percent.
b. Retailing Management (MAR 361): 0 percent of the students scored 70 percent or better across all areas covered with an average class score of 17.45. Within the areas covered, the percent of students that met the 70% performance criteria ranged between 0 and 60 percent.
c. Consumer Behavior (MAR 395): 0 percent of the students scored 70 percent or better across all areas covered with a class average of 31.84. Within the areas covered, the percentage of students that met the 70% criteria ranged from 15.38 to 45.62.

At first glance, student performance on the vocabulary quizzes seem troubling but the results may not be indicative of actual student performance. Student results on the vocabulary section can be partially attributed to attendance. The vocabulary quizzes are given at the beginning of the class (i.e., first 15 – 20 minutes) and some students miss these quizzes. There are no makeup for these quizzes so students that are chronically late do not do well of this portion of the course. Another reason for poor performance on the vocabulary exams can be attributed to the fact that many students did not have access to course material (i.e., the textbook) which prevented them from getting the information in a timely manner. To rectify this problem, some of the course material will be placed on reserve in the school library. Poor performance can also be attributed to the lack of preparation by the students. Whether the students had the textbook or not, many admitted to spending a minimal amount of time studying the material. Given the importance of vocabulary to the understanding any disciple, this reality is problematic. To rectify this problem, the weight of the vocabulary exams will be increased. This should motivate students to perform better in this area.

Content/Concept Quizzes: In general, the assessment criterion was that 70% of the students would score 70 percent or better in the areas assessed. Results indicate that student performance on content/concept quizzes met the minimum performance criteria. Results:
d. Principles of Marketing (MAR 301): 2.945 percent of the students scored 70 percent or better with a class average of 32.14. Within the areas covered, the percent of students that met the 70% performance criteria ranged from 11.76 to 47.06 percent.
e. Retailing Management (MAR 361): 100 percent of the students scored 70 percent or better with a class average score of 88.21. Within the areas covered, the percent of students that met the 70% performance criteria ranged from 50 to 75 percent.
f. Consumer Behavior (MAR 395): 100 percent of the students scored 70 percent or better with the class average of 78.40. Within the areas covered, the percent of students that met the 70% performance criteria ranged from 57.14 to 85.71 percent

Student performance on the content/concept quizzes for Retailing Management and Consumer behavior met or exceeded the minimum performance criteria. These results are indicative of actual student performance in the marketing program. Unlike the vocabulary quizzes, the content/concept quizzes are taken at the student’s leisure so there should be less pressure and anxiety surrounding this measurement.

Personal Selling Presentation: Student ability to perform personal selling functions, in either a consumer or industrial selling context, was assessed via a presentation. Performance was assessed based on: appearance, approach, warm-up, presentation, knowledge, questions, demonstration, objections, close, and flow. Results show that 100% of the students were able to meet the 70% performance criteria. Average class scores, for each area assessed, exceeded 80 percent with individual student performance scores ranging from 40 to 100 percent. Sales is one of the primary pillars forming the foundation of marketing so proficiency in this area is paramount for success in the profession. Based on the results, student performance indicates that they have mastered this skill set.

It should be pointed out that the structure of the Marketing program requires each student to write the front end of a formal research paper in three different classes. The first paper comes in the Retailing course and is designed to develop the student’s proficiency in writing an introduction, literature review, and reference sections. Hence, poor performance at this stage, although unwanted, is not unexpected. The objective is to improve student performance across the next two papers they write. The second attempt at writing a research paper comes in the Consumer Behavior (MAR 395) course while the third research paper (i.e., mastery) comes in the Marketing Research (MAR 495) course.

Research Paper – Retailing Management: In relation to the reference paper, the assessment criterion was that 70 percent of the students would score 70 percent or better in each area of the research paper rubric. Results from the Retailing Management (MAR 361) course indicate that student performance did not meet the minimum criteria for all areas assessed. Specifically, 70 percent of the students were able to develop the general introduction section (consisting of a concise research question). This demonstrates that students were able to hone in on a retailing topic and articulate a research question for study. Twenty percent of the students were able to properly develop the literature review section which had to include a testable research hypothesis. Students were able to discuss the literature they compiled but were unable to flush out a concise hypothesis that flowed from the literature. Fifty percent of the students also had problems properly citing there reference sources. A significant portion of this problem revolved around punctuation. Much of the problem here could be attributed to the fact that none of the students had ever written a formal research paper. To rectify the problem concerning the reference section, all students will be required to demonstrate that they have access to an APA style manual (this can be found in the library and online). In addition, all students will be exposed to the reference writing software provided in the library. If these two resources are utilized, the likelihood that students will perform poorly can be significantly reduced. To rectify the deficiencies pertaining to the introduction and literature review sections, time will be set aside in the first few weeks of class to discuss the tenets of a formal research paper. Additional instruction outside of class will be provided to those students still struggling with how to write a formal research paper.

Research Paper – Consumer Behavior: In relation to the reference paper, the assessment criterion was that 70 percent of the students would score 70 percent or better in each area of the research paper rubric. Results from the Consumer Behavior (MAR 495) course indicate that student performance met the minimum criteria for all areas assessed. Specifically, 85.70 percent of the students were able to develop the general introduction section (consisting of a concise research question). This demonstrates that students were able to hone in on a consumer behavior topic and articulate a research question for study. 71.43 percent of the students were able to properly develop the literature review section which had to include a testable research hypothesis. Students were able to discuss the literature they compiled and were able to flesh out a concise hypothesis that flowed from the literature. 71.43 percent of the students were able to properly cite their reference sources. There were still problems with proper punctuation and when to indent, but overall performance improved. To rectify the problem concerning the reference section, all students will be required to demonstrate that they have access to an APA style manual (this can be found in the library and online). In addition, all students will be exposed to the reference writing software provided in the library. To rectify the deficiencies pertaining to the introduction and literature review sections, time will be set aside in the first few weeks of class to discuss the tenets of a formal research paper. Additional instruction outside of class will be provided to those students still struggling with how to write a formal research paper.

Research Paper – Marketing Research: In relation to the reference paper, the assessment criterion was that 70 percent of the students would score 70 percent or better in each area of the research paper rubric. It is customary for the students to select their research topic but on occasion the topic is selected by the professor. When professors provide the research topic it falls under the special topic category. With this type of research project, students work closely with the professor and each student must contribute to each section. As a result, all students worked on the research paper as a group. Hence, student performance represented the overall evaluation of the final project. The rubric assessed the introduction, literature review, methodology, results, discussion, managerial applications, and reference section. Results indicate that student performance met or exceeded the performance criteria in all but the reference area. Satisfactory performance on the research paper indicates that students have mastered this skill set. However, there still exists a problem with proper citation. Again, to rectify the problem concerning the reference section, all students will be required to demonstrate that they have access to an APA style manual (this can be found in the library and online). To arrest any other deficiencies, additional instruction outside of class will be provided to those students still struggling with how to write a formal research paper.